Maximize Your Yoga; Translate it to the Bike

GET THE MOST OUT OF EACH YOGA MOBILITY MOVE
+ HOW THAT TRANSLATES TO GOOD FORM ON THE BIKE (or any sport)

Whether you are a time-starved cyclist trying to optimize performance, a dedicated yoga practitioner, or somewhere in between, the following tips are GREAT reminders how to improve EVERY yoga/mobility move.

1. LIFT THE CHEST + LENGTHEN THE SPINE.
Tune Yoga may 2012 studio shots
This is one of the things I repeat MOST often in my classes and coaching cyclists on the bike and on the yoga mat. On the yoga mat, when you invite space in the spine, draw the crown of the head to the ceiling and get as much length as you can, you will feel simultaneously strong, confident, light, buoyant and engaged. It is also promoting great health in the spine and other systems of the body. On the bike it translates to a more open chest to optimize oxygen uptake and efficiency in the central nervous system through proper postural alignment.

2. LENGTHENING THE TAILBONE + ENGAGING THE RIBCAGE.
Tune Yoga may 2012 studio shots
When standing, most of us stick our butt out and ribcage forward, increasing the arch/curve in the low back. This can exacerbate deep back ache and be caused by core weakness in the back and belly muscles. On the bike, it means a weak core that draws energy away (an “energy leak”) from the pedal power of the legs and contributes to naggy back pain that hinders performance and enjoyment. This is not something you are trying to do on purpose, so stop it…! Instead, while standing, draw the front ribs back toward the back ribs, pull the belly button in toward the spine, and lengthen the tailbone toward the heels. We don’t want to completely obliterate the lumbar/low back curve, but reduce it and effectively lengthen and strengthen the core – front, side and back. Rewiring the body in this way standing will then translate to proper postural form and function while in the saddle.

3. FIND YOUR ROOTS – HANDS, SITBONES, FEET.
wl zen
In yoga standing poses on the mat, press your feet into floor for grounding and stability. The feet are the forgotten body part – crammed in “leather coffins” all day – cycling shoes being some of the worst of all. Sooo, give them freedom, space and health by spreading them wide and planting them firmly when you are doing your yoga or just standing in other capacities. Similarly, in seated positions in yoga, feel your sitting bones equally root into the floor, or when sitting on chairs try to find that rooting in the pelvis. In yoga poses using the hands, spread the fingers w-i-d-e and root into the mat making for a stronger, even safer, practice. This helps open, release and even strengthen the hands that grip our bike handlebars so tightly.

4. HOLD THE YOGA POSE BUT NEVER THE BREATH.
Tune Yoga may 2012 studio shots
Inhale deeply > exhale completely > repeat. This is the core element of a yoga practice to focus the mind and calm / release the body. Learning to lengthen the breath and syncing the movements to the breath is the critical component to the yoga practice.  It translates to stronger cycling performance by giving the body MORE of what it needs when it needs it most – keeping it as non-responsive as possible even in tough efforts on the bike.

5. ENERGIZE + RELAX SIMULTANEOUSLY.
Tune Yoga may 2012 studio shots
Yoga postures require awakening and engagement of the area involved, so try to find a sense of ease and letting go even as you are engaging the focus muscle. Take the stretch to the point of resistance, then take a deep breath and back it off a bit. (This is particularly important for cyclists and athletes to let the muscle recover, renew and relax.) On the bike, we ideally find a “Zen-like” state in our efforts, even when pushing hard in a time trial, tough interval set or chasing down a break or rambunctious riding partner. Training ourselves to stay relaxed, focused and yet pushing and engaging is the key to taking your performance to the next level.

 

Women’s Cycling Clinics

BECOME A BETTER CYCLIST! NO MATTER WHAT YOUR CURRENT LEVEL. IMPROVE YOUR RIDING CONFIDENCE and GET FASTER/STRONGER.

Join me (Leslee Schenk Trzcinski), a former pro cyclist, US National cycling team member, and winner of two world championship medals, Coors International Classic stage wins, Colorado Athlete of the Year,  among many other distinctions. I am now a certified USA Cycling coach and yoga instructor and work closely with national coaches and riders as well as entry level riders to improve their performance.

world silver medalusac camp photoCoors Classic hill climb

Women, ranged from new riders to experienced, are grouped according to comfort and skill level and participate in interactive sessions appropriate to your needs.

CLINIC SCOOP
– Two sessions (best results from attending both sessions)
– Saturday, August 23 and Sunday, August 24
– Noon to 4pm each day.
– Event *CHECK IN 11:30am*
– Canandaigua, NY location
– $60 per session or $100 to attend both days (pre-register and pre-pay required)
– You will complete an intake form and sign a standard waiver/release
– Helmet, eyewear, bike in good working order, clip-in shoes recommended by not req’d
– Space is limited and clinic will fill, so reserve your spot
– Pre-registration with pre-payment required
Register here – payment via PayPal, CC or check (payment instructions bottom of page)
Contact me with questions

OSMO product samples and water bottles will be distributed
OSMO

TOPIC AREA AND DRILL OVERVIEW

– Saturday Focus Areas
approx 15-25 total miles of riding – this is not a training camp, but rather a skill camp
– Posture and form on the bike
bike man - good form in stick figure
– Cadence (and smooth pedal stroke drills)
– Shifting (this is important for ALL levels)
– Cornering (it is not intuitive)
– Climbing session 1 (form, ease, in + out of saddle position)
– Descending session 1 (the how and why)
(depending on the groups, part of this day may be dedicated to learning how to clip in and out of clipless pedals if we have some riders needing to make that upgrade – we can help!)

– Sunday Focus Areas 
approx 15-25 total miles of riding – this is not a training camp, but rather a skill camp
– Practice riding in a group
– Paceline (TBD depending on the group skill level)
– How to ride faster – interval examples and experimentation
– Climbing session 2 (how to tackle hills more effectively; hill repeats for training)
– Stretches for cyclists (a few key ones to keep you injury free; done at the bike)
– Nutrition (for training and events)

devo camp LT 2cyclofemme pre-ride stretchcyclists - supa pada

RIDE LEADER(S) / RIDE GROUPING
Leslee as the main ride leader. If we break into groups, I will still oversee both groups with experienced assistance as needed for solid individual attention. No one is left behind. SAG support available for both days.

Depending on those registered, we may break into 2 groups:
(1) Beginner to Intermediate – ideally you have ridden approx 15-20 miles (even if a challenging ride). Riders should be able to ride in traffic (although often they are seeking to improve their confidence in doing so).  Riders should also have ridden at least once with a group, although this is also often an area they wish to improve on. We will focus on improving skills, confidence and make fitness recommendations for riders in a supportive environment where you can safely learn to handle your bike better and understand how to continue to build on this after the clinic.
pre ride with WCR 2WCR great viewsharon sitting up side view
(2) Intermediate to Experienced –  Riders should be able to ride in a group of cyclists on a road with traffic. We will take intermediate riders to the next stage or push more advanced riders.  The philosophy is the same as with all the women’s clinics: a supportive environment, improving skills and make fitness and riding enhancement recommendations, etc. designed to push you to the next level – whatever that is for you.

CONTINGENCY
Outdoor riding is weather contingent. If one day looks better than the other just prior to event, itinerary will change slightly to accommodate indoor activities such as stretching, nutrition, training approaches, as well as indoor riding (interval recommendations and form/posture analysis and overview) with your bike on a trainer (bring your own or loaner available).

TESTIMONIALS FROM PAST CLINICS and COACHING
Thank you for accommodating a range of skill levels. As a beginner, I was intimidated at first and was afraid that I would hold back the pack or be out of my comfort zone, but forming groups allowed me to get so much out of the time. I felt so much more comfortable on my bike after the clinic! I thought it was great to have the indoor/outdoor sessions because the clinic really covered so much about riding. 

I really became more comfortable and confident on my bike after the clinic. Before the clinic I was very uncomfortable and felt unsteady on my bike and by the end I was riding with no hands! I learned how to use my body on the bike to control it, instead of it controlling me or forcing movements. 

Thanks for explaining things in plain terms and being patient with me as I gained confidence on the bike.

The road time was great – one leg drills, cornering, paceline work – all really useful skills that I can integrate into my cycling on an ongoing basis.

I just did some sprints on the bike, this being the day after your yoga for cyclists workshop. I have increased another, or maybe even two, gears due to my improved posture and breathing. I think that you have extended my cycling career by at least ten years. With years of experience biking, and years of yoga, my eyes were opened.

PAYMENT OPTIONS
1. PAYPAL – secure, fast, easy. Go to PayPal.com and then go to “Transfer” in the navigation. Then under Transfer, select “Send someone money” and follow the instructions. The email you will send to is:info@tuneyoga.com  You and I will both get a confirmation from PayPal of the transaction

2. CREDIT CARD – Visa, MC, Amex, Discover. You can call me (585-362-6715) or send the following four things over three separate emails – your credit card number, the exp date, the 3 digit code on back and your zip code.

3. CHECK – payable to TUNE yoga + coaching.
4923 Butler Road
Canandaigua, NY 14424

 

Cape Cod Workshops

CAPE COD WORKSHOP SERIES – COLUMBUS DAY
Quiet Mind Studio, Wellfleet, Mass

2 WORKSHOPS – to combine or just do one – TO LOOK AT YOGA, STRENGTH and PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION FROM A UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE
BOTH ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12

1. SPORTS POSTURE – Form, Function, Power, Longevity
10:30am – 12:30pm
Rehydration with Zico® Coconut Water – provided for the session

    
With traditional and non-traditional yoga postures as well as a basic overview of anatomy, we’ll explore:

  • The core – front, side, back – and explore how to reduce “energy leaks” to maximize muscular efficiency
  • The pelvis to core connection and its role as the supporting foundation
  • Explore specific MUSCLES then move to synergistic MOVEMENTS
  • The importance of hamstring + hip flexibility

2. STALKING THE WILD PSOAS
HOW THE HIP FLEXOR IMPACTS SPORT + LIFE
1:00pm – 3:00pm
Rehydration with Zico® Coconut Water – provided for the session


With yoga postures and a basic overview of the hip and leg anatomy, we’ll:

  • Learn what problems arise from a tight psoas – and  how to avoid them
  • See how the diaphragm and the psoas are connected, and why that’s important
  • Explore passive and active ways/positions to make the psoas supple and happy
  • Gain access to the psoas via the quadriceps
  • Study the relationship between the psoas and the piriformis

$75 for both (a $15 savings) or $45 for each Large color handout provided.
Pre-registration required through Zack Dixon –  info@quietmindstudio.com or
508-349-2429
95 Commercial St, Wellfleet, MA
  

Sage Masters Athlete Workshop

SageRiders Masters Workshop Series #1

SEPTEMBER 12-15, 2013 Canandaigua, New York

Enjoy a change of pace to be refreshed, equipped and inspired.

Experience:  Be refreshed with fellow masters athletes with supported daily rides led by world class cyclists.

Knowledge:  Be equipped from interactive lectures dealing with information specifically for the masters athlete not found on the bookshelves today with topics such as;  nutrition, thermoregulation, hydration, training, recovery, bike fit and body health. And, a first-ever module will be focus on the menopausal female athlete.

Wisdom: Be inspired from the ‘SageNetwork’ of other Masters athletes and look inside their “wisdom toolbox.”

  • Thursday Evening  – Welcome with Canadian Olympic Cyclist Marilyn Trout, US National Team Cyclist, Leslee Schenk Trzcinski (TUNE yoga) and other guests
  • Friday Morning   –  Session #1 Changing Gears: Training +  Recovery of the Masters athlete (PRESENTED BY MARY EGGARS, IRONMAN TRIATHLETE AND AREA CELEBRITY)  /  Ride, run  #1
  • Friday Afternoon – Free time/Local activity
  • Friday Evening   – Dinner & Session #2 – Changing Gears with inspirational local athlete KEVIN ROYSTON (HIT & RUN VICTIM, AMPUTEE AND PHENOMENALLY DRIVEN ATHLETE)
  • Saturday Morning  –  Session #3 – Nutrition & Recovery – including Fueling with Carbohydrate Sensitivity (PRESENTED BY AREA SPORTS NUTRITIONIST and PANEL)      /  Ride or run #2
  • Saturday Afternoon – Free time / Local activity
  • Saturday Evening – Dinner & Session #4 –  Changing Gears:  Riding the Heat Wave – Menopausal Module – (Men welcome too) – women in 40s can prepare, women in 50s and beyond can hear interesting data and tips for navigating the changes. Hear first hand accounts and ways women are dealing with it through nutrition, diet and lifestyle changes and awareness
  • Sunday Morning – Session #5 – Changing Gears with the experts: Panel with Q & A/Optional Ride or Run #3

Who:  All Master athletes (cyclists, runners, triathletes, ANY SPORT) who want a change, need a change or need to change.

Cost:  $399 Early Bird (by August 1) $475 (After 8/1) – includes Thursday reception, Friday & Saturday dinners, Fully Supported Rides, Five Workshop Sessions, SageRiders Jersey Special Workshop Discount, Product giveaways, and more

Accommodation Recommendation: Miami Motel* wwwmotelmiami.com breakfast included – $69/night queen and $79/night Double Queen rooms with kitchenette (* highly recommended)

For more information:                                                                                                                                 SageRider Workshop Series Coordinator Marilyn Trout 719.634.6221 Marilyn@TheSageProject.org  Canandaigua Workshop Coordinator Leslee Schenk Trzcinski 585.362.6715 info@tuneyoga.com

To provide a community of Masters athletes for encouragement and service to one another through shared experience, knowledge and wisdom as we change.

Changing gears is simple.  Choosing the best one takes wisdom.

loosen those hips and hams

For athletes or those active this summer, it is important to keep two key areas of the body opened, flexible and balanced:
a. the hamstrings
b. the hip flexors – mainly the psoas
For anyone, but especially cyclists and runners, both are primary causes for low back crankiness as well as reduced efficiency, power and speed in pedal stroke or running gait.
a.   b.  

Below are some ‘must do’ yoga movements to target these critical areas. The PRE-RIDE/RUN sequences are designed to be done even with your cleats or running shoes on. Regularity is KEY. Try to do these consistently for *great* results.

[1] PRE-RIDE/RUN SEQUENCE
Muscle research proves it is important and better to do DYNAMIC stretching pre-training to move the muscles and build some heat and blood flow. Do this sequence – targeting the psoas and hips –  up to three times each side prior to your ride or run. And, make sure you follow the breath instructions for optimal results to prep the body and even focus the mind.
[featuring YMX by Yellowman long sleeve peony jersey]


BREATHING DEEPLY,
stand tall and confident in mountain pose, INHALE…


EXHALE, lift L leg up, hands stay at side…


INHALE
, step L foot back and raise arms overhead, L leg straight and strong, R knee directly over R ankle…


EXHALE, pivot from hips to arrow pose, keep back flat, straight arms stay in line with ears, R knee stays over R ankle…


INHALE
, draw hands together at heart center, plugging thumbs gently into sternum, watch that R knee – keep it over the R ankle…


EXHALE
, twist to R, L elbow ‘catches’ R knee, L leg strong, and remember – R knee over R ankle, gaze upward…


INHALE, un-twist, weight comes fully into R foot keeping R knee slightly bent, lift L leg and balance, arms straight, gaze down to ground…


EXHALE, drop L foot right next to R, pause in chair pose, tailbone drawn down, arms reaching high…


INHALE, press into feet to stand, arms at side for mountain pose. Switch sides.


[2] PRE, DURING, POST RIDE/RUN SEQUENCE
A great release for low back, glute, outer hip and IT band. You can do this in shoes and even holding the top tube of your bike mid-ride or standing road side during mid-run.


Standing tall, tailbone dropping, hands at hips, cross R ankle over bent L knee…[for ease in balancing – grab a wall, a chair, a tree, a car, your top tube, your training partner…etc.]


Reach hands forward keeping back flat, shoulders back and down…


Pivot from hips and reach forward, hands stay shoulder height, back flat…


Drop arms to legs (R hand inside R knee, L hand on R foot), keeping back flat. Switch sides.

[3] POST RIDE SEQUENCE

After riding/training, STATIC stretches where we hold poses for at least one minute, helping to lengthen tight hamstrings and overused hip flexors and spine for injury prevention, balance and recovery. Here are just three great ways to release the psoas, hip flexors and back.  More poses can be found here.

a. CROSS LEGGED BRIDGE

A light backbend that strengthens/releases back, legs and hips, massages spine, and opens chest.

  • Back flat on ground, knees bent. Elbows bent alongside ribs, fingers point to ceiling.
  • Bring R ankle onto L knee and flex R foot. Push L foot and elbows hard into mat to lift hips off floor.
  • Do not tuck chin, keep throat open.
  • Drop R knee toward floor but don’t let R hip drop – keep both hip points level.
  • Breathe deep and steady. Hold for 5 or more steady breaths; switch sides.

b.THREAD THE NEEDLE


Opens and releases outer hip and hamstrings while neutralizing the spine.

  • Back flat on ground, knees bent. Bring R ankle onto L knee and flex R foot. Lift bent L leg and bring R knee toward chest.
  • Put R hand on inside of R knee and L hand on R foot. Gently push R knee away from body.
  • As you exhale, continue to draw L knee closer to chest keeping low back on floor.
  • Relax shoulders and back. Hold for minimum of one minute; switch sides.

c. HAMSTRING HAVEN

Stretches all hamstrings while releasing accumulated tension in low back. 

  • Using a strap or belt, lie on back, legs extended. Place strap around ball of R foot.
  • Slowly lengthen R leg so strap slides through hand until leg is fully straightened. Elbows fully extend.
  • Relax upper neck and shoulders. Press ball of R foot into strap while pulling strap into ball of foot.
  • Keep back of L  thigh pressing into ground, L foot flexed.
  • Hold 1 to 2 minutes each side breathing deeply, steadily.
  • NOTE: KEEP BOTH KNEES BENT IF HAMSTRINGS EXTREMELY TIGHT AND WORK SLOWLY TOWARD STRAIGHTENING LEGS.

 

 

 

Canandaigua CycloFemme Ride 2014 – Join Us!

JOIN THE MOVEMENT!!
SUNDAY, MAY 11, 2014
cyclofemme image

Sunday May 11. 2014 [Mother’s Day] join what will be over 250+ rides going on all over the world as part of the CYCLOFEMME movement – simply to get not just women – but EVERYONE – out on their bikes.  YAY – WE LOVE THAT!! Here is a great story on the origin of the ride – and its innovator here.

If you haven’t already, please register here just so we have a sense of head count.
The ride is FREE.
WCR great view

Here are the details of our Canandaigua ride below:

[A] 3 ROUTES TO CHOOSE FROM
1. 15(ish) miles – from downtown Cdga to Ononda Park, W Lake Rd
2. 22(ish) miles – from downtown Cdga to Bristol Lodge, Seneca Point Rd
3. 45(ish) miles – from downtown Cdga around Cdga Lake (west to east)

[B] ROUTE DETAILS
   1. Ononda Park – rolling from our start location (see below), we’ll turn onto Parish Street, then onto Cty Rd 16/W Lake Road for a leisure ride flat nearly all the way – except for one short hill – to Ononda Park – left side of road. If this is your chosen route, you can enter the park and find the snack table near the lake with water, oranges, CHOCOLATE (of course) and other stuff. Then you’ll turn around and roll back to our start location. (There is a hill going back.)

2. Bristol Lodge – rolling from our start location (see below)  we’ll turn onto Parish Street, then onto Cty Rd 16/W Lake Road for a leisure ride passing Ononda Park (stop of shorter ride – #1 above) and climb to Bristol Lodge.  You have a choice of climb – Miller hill (passing Miller nursery and staying on W Lake Road and then turning L at top onto Seneca Point Road and rolling to Bristol Lodge on right) *OR* turning left onto Coye Road and while flat for a bit, will have to shorter but still good climbs. At top of Coye Rd, you turn left and roll to Bristol Lodge on the right.) Stopping here for snacks – oranges, chocolate (of course!), water and other things. This group will turn around from here and head back home to our start location.

3. Around Canandaigua Lake – rolling from our start location (see below)  we’ll turn onto Parish Street, then onto Cty Rd 16/W Lake Road for a leisure ride passing Ononda Park (stop of shorter ride option #1 above) and climb to Bristol Lodge. You have a choice of climb – Miller hill (passing Miller nursery and staying on W Lake Road and then turning L at top onto Seneca Point Road and rolling to Bristol Lodge on right) *OR* turning left onto Coye Road and while flat for a bit, will have to shorter but still good climbs. At top of Coye Rd, you turn left and roll to Bristol Lodge on the right.) Stopping here for snacks – oranges, chocolate (of course), water and other things. From this stop (ride #2 option above turns back home from here), this group will continue down Seneca Point Road to Hicks Road for a gorgeous climb back to County Rd 21. Maps will be provided at ride start for the rest of this route that rolls down pass Monica’s Pies and across to the east side, through Middlesex and back north ultimately hugging the shores of Canandaigua lake and into downtown Canandaigua.

Of course the group will split on hills and there is no obligation to stay together.  This is a ride as you want event – leisurely, moderate, fast, slow, you choose. Just have fun and BE SAFE!!

ALL RIDES ARE WELCOME TO COME INSIDE FOR A DRINK/SNACK AFTER.

[C] TIME
8:30 meet-up; 9am roll-out.
(You need to sign in, sign a waiver pre-ride)
tandem

[D] START AND END LOCATION
699 South Main Street, Hardcore/Cdga CrossFit + TUNE yoga location. (Corner of 5&20 – Plaza with Cdga Nat Bank, Vineyards, Macri’s Deli, etc.) TONS of parking. Will leave from that parking lot. Come inside (enter under Curves sign) to use bathroom, sign in, etc.)

cyclofemme group shot

[E] RIDE REQUIREMENTS
– Helmet must be worn.
– Bike in good working order.
– Bike tube and CO2/pump in case of flat (no formal support/sag)
– Waiver signed SUNDAY morning (standard)
– Water bottle/rehydration (water + snacks (READ: CHOCOLATE!!!) provided at Ononda and Bristol)
– Safe riding. Road rules followed – no flipping off drivers; no running red lights; no riding two abreast; be safe / be smart. Recommend bright jersey color (YMX is good for that!), blinky lights and RoadID bracelet worn.

6. WEATHER?
We will ride unless it is rainy, sleety, etc – we’re hardcore, but not THAT hardcore. Use your judgement – text or call if you are wondering. (Contact info just below)

7. PRE-RIDE STRETCH – we’ll do this for just a few minutes at our bikes to stretch out the hamstrings and get some lung action going. 

8. QUESTIONS? Contact Leslee.

usac camp photo

 

 

get the most out of each move

Whether you are a time-starved athlete trying to optimize performance, a dedicated yoga practitioner, or somewhere in between, the following tips are GREAT reminders how to improve EVERY yoga/mobility move.

1. LIFT + LENGTHEN THE SPINE.
This is one of the things I repeat MOST often in my classes and coaching athletes. When you invite space in the spine, draw the crown of the head to the ceiling and get as much length as you can, you will feel simultaneously strong, confident, light, buoyant and engaged. It is also promoting great health in the spine and other systems of the body.

2. LENGTHENING THE TAILBONE + ENGAGING THE RIBCAGE.
Most of us stick our butt out and ribcage forward, increasing the arch/curve in the low back. This can exaccerbate deep back ache and be caused by core weakness in the back and belly muscles. This is not a backbend that you are trying to do on purpose, so stop it…! Instead, draw the front ribs back toward the back ribs, pull the belly button in toward the spine, and lengthen the tailbone toward the heels. We don’t want to completely obliterate the lumbar/low back curve, but reduce it and effectively lengthen and strengthen the core – front, side and back.

3. FIND YOUR ROOTS.
In standing poses, press your feet into floor for grounding and stability. The feet are the forgotten body part – crammed in “leather coffins” all day. Sooo, give them freedom, space and health by spreading them wide and planting them firmly.  In seated positions, feel your sitting bones equally root into the floor. In poses using the hands, spread the fingers w-i-d-e and root into the mat making for a stronger, even safer, practice.

4. HOLD THE POSE BUT NEVER THE BREATH.
Inhale deeply  > exhale completely > repeat. This is the core element of the practice to focus the mind and calm / release the body. It is critical to derive the benefits of the postures no matter your level, or your objectives. And, take that off the mat for better [everything].

5. ENERGIZE + RELAX SIMULTANEOUSLY.
While the postures require awakening and engagement of the area involved, try to find a sense of ease and letting go. Take the pose to the point of resistance, then take a deep breath and back it off a bit. (Sometimes more than other times depending on if you are recovering from a tough workout or simply want a more gentle move.) You are engaging, yet not struggling or pushing.

form and function on the bike workshop

SPECIALTY WORKSHOP:
FORM AND FUNCTION FOR CYCLISTS and TRIATHLETES.

kristin armstrong GREAT sprint shot good form carmen small

UPCOMING DATES:
– SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 11am to 2pm
ALL LEVELS WELCOME (yoga newbies too, of course…)

Join Leslee Schenk Trzcinski, US national team and world championship medaling cyclist now yoga / mobility instructor and USA CYCLING certified cycling coach 

“Leslee’s class is a MUST for all cyclists.”
~Todd Scheske, Level 1 USA Cycling Coach, Elite Cyclist/Nat’l and World Championship Medalist

“Thank you for the yoga classes. Your yoga for athletes focus is perfect to counter my tight hamstrings, hip flexors and gain overall balance and focus. I plan to come more often this off-season to aid training and recovery.” Danielle Ohlson, Pro Triathlete

“Thanks so much for the great workshop yesterday, Leslee. I learned so much – little tweaks that I have no doubt will help a lot. Got out for my first outdoor ride this morning – and you were in my head much of the way … “don’t break the toothpicks” “let your light shine” etc. I realized that I’d been holding my head all wrong – and doing a number on my neck. I’m so grateful for you.” Wende Cleary, all-around athlete – triathlete, marathoner


 singletrack academy yoga session

Take Your 2013 Season to the Next Level with Mobility and Strength off and on the Bike  *Back by popular demand*

Learning how to apply core principles of strength in a weak/underutilized core (mainly back and shoulders) and flexibility in the power muscles (quads, glutes, hamstrings) to ensure optimal power, efficiency, endurance and taking your summer 2013 to the next level. This is an extended workshop that spends 2+ hours on the yoga mat, then time on YOUR bike (on trainer – provide your own OR use an indoor cycling bike provided at the studio) that for form analysis, application of the yoga principles we review and how to ensure position is not hindering – but rather propelling – your ascent to the next level.

cycling workshop posture
(
pictured here with me are Cat 1 cyclists Cory Khuns and Todd Scheske)

FEE
$65 includes large 4-color handout for ongoing reference post event plus giveaways and door prize.

SPACE IS LIMITED.
PRE-REGISTRATION and PRE-PAYMENT REQUIRED.
Register here to reserve your spot.

LOCATION
MBody Studio on University.

REQ’D EQUIPMENT
– your bike OR you can use a Keiser indoor spin bike at MBody
– cycling shoes (whatever they are) – if you are using MBody bike they must be SPD cleats
– stationary bike trainer (if bringing your bike)
– comfortable clothes to move from yoga mat to on the bike
– water / a snack maybe (MBody has a great juice bar)
– not a full stomach (eat a full meal more than 2 hrs prior, small snack 1 hour prior)

 

what is ‘it’ about the IT band?

IT BAND SYNDROME – OUCH!!!
Commonly known as “runner’s knee,” IT band friction syndrome also plagues cyclists.  Symptoms include pain on the outside of the knee, tenderness and sometimes swelling. Pain can be dull to ice picky, oh my ___ make it stop shooting pain.

I know the drill – I had the incredibly painful ice pick in the outer knee IT band friction syndrome. It hurts!  Luckily, I had successful IT band surgery back in 1990 after experiencing quick onset of that acute, debilitating pain. I was racing on the prestigious and phenomenal 7-Eleven cycling team and shattered my collarbone (four pieces, compound, through the skin…2 surgeries…but that is another story in itself) and as I worked to regain fitness being off the bike, I incorporated some running into my training. The hard trail running on uneven surfaces, coupled with a lot of trainer riding, put my IT band in a tizzy. Thankfully, I had the best in the world in the form of Boulder’s famous Andy Pruitt. He and a small team of docs got me in and out – cut the inflammed IT band out – and I healed quickly and have not experience pain since – even with four marathons and lots of cycling training later.

If you’ve been riding and/or running for a while, chances are you’ve experienced it. Here is a breakdown of what IT band friction syndrome is and how to address it problem.

IT pain is typically associated with prolonged, repetitive activity – however, the advanced cases may cause pain when simply walking or going up and down stairs. You may feel stiff or tight after periods of inactivity and especially after prolonged sitting.

WHERE?
The iliotibial band (ITB) is a tendonous and fascial band that originates on the iliac crest (hipbone). It also attaches to the gluteal muscles (your bum) and the tensor fascia latae (TFL). The TFL is the muscle on the outside of your hip that moves your leg outward.

As the ITB travels toward the knee, it narrows and attaches to the outside of the tibial plateau (the top of your lower leg bone) with fibers also extending over to the patella. The band often feels palpably tight and can almost be strummed with your fingers on the outside of the knee.

The syndrome occurs as the band slides across the lateral femoral epicondyle, a bony bump on the outside of the femur – a little bony bump just below the outside of your knee (ask me to show you my scar there some time…!) As your knee flexes and extends repeatedly, the band can become inflamed. During a pedal stroke, the band crosses the epicondyle once on the down stroke and again as the knee flexes back to the top of the stroke. This pic from Athletes Treating Athletes shows where it typically hurts:

If you consider a cyclist pedaling at a cadence of 90 rpm, that would equate to 180 slides per minute. On a two-hour ride, the ITB will cross the knee 21,600 times..wowza.

Many factors can contribute to the problem. One is muscle imbalance, where some muscle groups are tight and others are weak or fatigued. The basic cycling position can feed these imbalances.

Tightness, or a loss in flexibility, can occur in the hip flexors, hip abductors and internal rotators. Correspondingly, it often helps to strengthen the hip extensors, abductors and external rotators. And, little known fact that week glute muscles (glutes are considered part of the core) can also be a big contributor.

Other things that can cause IT band syndrome are alignment and bike fit. Even with good saddle height and position, problems can arise from misalignment of your feet and ankles. People who tend to be bowlegged are often more at risk. However, a more common issue is the person who tends to be a pronator, or flat footed.

In cycling there is a nearly constant downward force on the pedals. Although there isn’t the impact associated with running, there is still a tremendous amount of room for joint movement in the ankle, hind foot and mid foot.

As downward force is exerted on the pedal, the foot pronates, resulting in associated internal rotation and abduction of the hip and knee. This creates increased tension on the ITB and a higher degree of friction.

If foot and/or ankle misalignment is an issue, the problem can often be addressed with a good set of shoe inserts. In severe cases, custom orthotics may be necessary. It is also important to ensure proper cleat placement so the knee tracks properly over the foot and pedal.

FIX IT HOW?
Treatment of IT band syndrome includes stretching, massage and frequent icing. Although flexibility of the ITB complex isn’t typically an issue, stretching can be beneficial (especially during the healing process). Massage promotes blood flow to the affected area and can minimize scar tissue formation. This can be done by a professional or self massage or using a foam roll or massage stick. Sometimes, however stretching and rest is not enough and active release techniques (A.R.T.) is required.

The good news is that, often, you don’t have to stop riding completely. Exercise can promote blood flow and be beneficial to the healing process. However, you probably should curb the intensity and duration until the inflammation goes away. If the stress on the affected tissues can be reduced and the pain subsides, begin to increase your riding time and intensity.

If your symptoms don’t improve, get more help from docs. Lateral meniscus tears, articular cartilage lesions or arthritic changes can mimic ITB problems. However, it is always best to catch and address the problem early. Better yet, get on a program to reduce your risk and address any factors you know may contribute to the problem.

For example, if you know you are a pronator, get inserts in your shoes now—not when the pain starts. The best prevention is by ensuring proper alignment and fit as well as being consistent with a yoga program and ensuring core strength is solid.

This pose below – one knee bent, one straight – is a great example of an IT band stretch targeting primarily the upper (hip) end of the band. More stretches can be found in my other blog posts.

seeing is being – the science behind visualization

There REALLY IS science behind the inspiring phrases as athletes or those trying to commit to New Year’s resolutions hear:   “visualize your success” or “imagine your greatest possibilities”. And, seeing what you want in your mind is benefitted by physical, printed, visual aids…read on..

Research has shown that there is a strong scientific basis for how and why visualization works. It is a well-known fact that we stimulate the same brain regions when we visualize an action and when we actually perform that same action.

For example, as speaker, psychiatrist and Huffington Post blogger Srinivasan Pillay – author of  ‘Life Unlocked’ and ‘Your Brain and Business’ – shares, when you visualize lifting your right hand, it stimulates the same part of the brain that is activated when you actually lift your right hand. This shared area of brain activation when we imagine an action and perform it has been demonstrated extensively in the scientific literature.

Pillay also reports on the the striking example of how visualization increases brain activation is seen in stroke. When a person has a stroke due to a blood clot in a brain artery, blood cannot reach the tissue that the artery once fed with oxygen and nutrients, and that tissue dies. This tissue death then spreads to the surrounding area that does not receive the blood any more. However, if a person with this stroke imagines moving the affected arm or leg, brain blood flow to the affected area increases and the surrounding brain tissue is saved. Imagining moving a limb, even after it has been paralyzed after a stroke, increases brain blood flow enough to diminish the amount of tissue death. This is a very clear indicator of the power of visualization.

Athletes, of course, have known about, and used, this power for a long time, using imagery and visualization to run races in goal times. Studies show athletes first imagine running a race in goal time in as much detail as possible and are then able to execute it after practicing visualizing it. To cite a few of the many studies: One showed that “…visualizations under hypnosis enabled nationally ranked Stanford male gymnasts to execute for the first time several complex tricks that they had been working on for over a year. The gymnasts were able to eliminate timing errors in the tricks, to increase flexibility, and, possibly, to concentrate strength…” Another showed that youth soccer players increased their confidence in playing when they visualized their moves. Visualization has also been shown to improve high jumpers clearing the bar.

BUT, tell your brain your plan in a thousand words, and it gets bored mid-way and wants to go to sleep. But draw it – or show it – a picture or photo and it will respond with much deeper interest and attention. Brain chemistry research also proves this as fact.

SO, yogis, athletes, achievers, doers, dreamers, goal setters, et al….here’s your assignment:

Draw, paint, color or source out / cut out images from magazines, the web, Pinterest, etc. – ones that inspire you, uplift you, reveal success and that are in alignment with your desires and/or show you realizing the success you are dreaming of; the goals you want to achieve. Place/arrange/randomly affix the images, drawings, cut-outs on a bulletin board or wall or other surface in your life.

As studies show, the images will get into your subconscious and help you to manifest them and convert your dreams to your reality or your goals to your growing list of achievements.

Here are a few images from my inspiration and goal visualization board. Each image has a meaning, a motive, a message – maybe not obvious to others, but only to me. And that’s what makes it uniquely mine. Have fun doing one – or more – for YOU.